Resurrection Window

The resurrection of Christ is at the core of the Catholic Faith and is a source of great hope. Through Christ’s resurrection and ascension into heaven, the faithful were promised eternal life with Him in heaven. ‘Christ offered himself for our salvation’. (Luke 22:19).

Catholics believe that a human being is a union of body and soul, and that death is a temporary separation of body and soul until the day when Christ comes again to judge the living and the dead. At this General Judgement all the dead will be resurrected.

During the celebration of Mass Catholics profess their faith with the words “I believe in life everlasting” and are reminded of Christ’s promise of heaven when they celebrate the Eucharist.

This stunning stained glass window depicts the Resurrection of Christ, which is at the core of the Catholic Faith. Through Christ’s resurrection and ascension into heaven, the faithful were promised eternal life with Him in heaven, and Catholics are reminded of this promise when they celebrate the Eucharist.

“The steeple-like effect of this central window and bold cross above is a Hamilton landmark and it remains firmly in place in the remodelled cathedral, offering beauty and a sense of history”. Irvine, Denise, Cathedral of the Blessed Virgin Mary Hamilton, New Zealand, 2009, p. 25

This Resurrection window has been associated with Hamilton’s “church on the hill” for more than 50 years, although it has seen a few changes in its time. It was made for the early Church of Our Lady of the Rosary in the 1950s, by Dutch immigrant artist Marin Roestenburg who lived and worked in Taihape. The parish priest at the time was Monsignor Leonard Buxton.

The leadlights were transferred to the 1975 Church of Our Lady of the Rosary, and the Resurrection scene was placed within a brilliantly colourful epoxy resin “leadlight” window designed by architects White, White and MacDonald, and crafted by Hampton’s Studio in Christchurch.

The epoxy resin surround was replaced for the new building with handmade American art glass; this remains true to the original design, painstakingly replicated by Hamilton stained glass artist Stephen Brodribb, of Leadlight Products.

The window filters the afternoon sun and casts the colours of the rainbow into the nave, ensuring the legacy of Martin Roestenbury and Monsignor Buxton lives on.

Source: Irvine, Denise, Cathedral of the Blessed Virgin Mary Hamilton, New Zealand, 2009